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The Elimination of Violence against Women: A Priority for the IYCW PDF Print E-mail

Violence against women is not confined to one country or continent, it crosses borders and oceans

 

The International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, celebrated on 25th November, is an opportunity to look at the statistics released by the international institutions. They are horrifying. According to World Bank data, “women aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria.” UN figures show that “around the world, at least one in every three women has been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused in her lifetime” and in armed conflict zones, hundreds of thousands of women have been raped.

 

Violence against women is not confined to a specific country or continent, it crosses borders and oceans. It is not confined to a specific culture or social class, it affects all cultures and every stratum of society. It is not only physical but also moral. According to the UN, “the roots of violence against women lie in the historic inequality of power in the relations between men and women and in the persistent discrimination against women.” The IYCW is fully aware of this, and gender equality is precisely one of the key pillars of its international campaign for decent work and a dignified life for all young workers.

 

The work carried out by the IYCW with domestic workers, who are often victims of violence, with teenage mothers, for instance in Namibia (see the article by James Denteh on early pregnancies and the situation of teenage mothers in Africa), and with women in general, aims at promoting greater equality between genders. The IYCW considers that education is an important aspect to eliminate violence: the education of women so that they can exercise their rights, and the education of men so that they respect the dignity of women.

 

Much remains to be done in this regard, but the IYCW national movements work every day to promote greater equality for women and to fight discrimination, including within our own organization.

 

 
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